Favorite resources: creating a language for your novel

So you’re all ready with the inspiration for your constructed language and you’re raring to go? In this post, step 2 of our writer’s approach to conlanging, I’ve linked some of the best research resources you can consult to get started on a new or first-time conlang.  The number of crosses (✚) beside each resource, up to four, indicates how technical and difficult to read they are so you can be prepared. Your aim is to have a resource available that will help guide you through the most important parts of your grammar’s “sketch” before you can tuck in to some sweet, sweet translation, and which you can consult when the going gets tough.

  • Wiktionary is awesome for its indexes of every word in every language it knows, which are often an amazing source for vocab inspiration, and its translations. (Did you know the Nahuatl word for ‘fish’ is michin? Now you do.) It’ll help you learn non-English ways to arrange meanings with words, which is a really important element of conlanging. More on this in an upcoming post on growing your word list. ✚
  • Laypeople’s “learn to speak X” websites. Finding a good one of these for your inspiration language is like gold when you first start out. Eventually, though, you’ll outgrow them and want the technical explanation for the phenomenon they talk about. ✚
  • Wikipedia grammar explanations are sometimes relatively very technical and confused, but Wikipedia is also a guaranteed source of vocab for inspiration languages that are less present on the web, e.g., Winaray. ✚✚~✚✚✚
  • Other conlangers’ websites. These are especially good resources for first-time conlangers who want to present their language to other people someday so you can see how others do it. David J. Peterson and Mark Rosenfelder are two well-known conlangers with pretty accessible websites. ✚✚ ~ ✚✚✚✚
  • The World Atlas of Language Structures is, literally, my favorite site on the Internet. Info on linguistic elements from a cross-linguistic perspective that will give you a great sense of what is possible and what’s common in language.  ✚✚✚
  • University libraries. If you don’t go to a university, it might seriously be worth it to buy a library membership from the nearest university if you really get into conlanging. Local libraries typically don’t carry the kind of academic info you’ll need when you get up in the four-cross difficulty range. ✚✚✚✚
  • Google Scholar is also a good source of academic linguistics! Some of the articles you really want are going to be locked behind a paywall, though. It’s gonna hurt. ✚✚✚✚
  • Academia.edu is another place you can find academic linguistics for free on the Web. ✚✚✚✚

And don’t forget about other conlang guides! Each of these takes a different tack on how to conlang, but they can all be helpful:

  • Language Construction Kit is really powerful for people who have a good grasp already on some linguistics terminology and for people who do want to get on their sound system early. (The way I approached conlanging when I started used no sound system at all, and I think it’s a good way to go for beginners who just aren’t that into phonology yet.) ✚✚~✚✚✚
  • The Conlang Wikibook is very effectively and concisely organized and provides good scaffolding for “leveling up”. If you would rather get to know your language better before you start translating, or if you want to start another language with more complex grammatical concepts, this is a good place to start. ✚ ~ ✚✚✚✚
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